Children’s Memory Scale

CMS

Assess children's memory abilities by comparing memory and learning to ability, attention, and achievement. The Children's Memory Scale™ (CMS) fills the need for a comprehensive learning and memory test for children ages five to 16.

Overview

Age range:

5 to 16 years

Publication date:

1997

Qualification level:

C

Completion time:

30 minutes: 20 minutes for the six core subtests, 10 to15 minutes for the long-delayed memory test. Includes a 30-minute break during which you can administer other verbal or nonverbal measures

Forms:

Two, one for ages 5-8, and one for ages 9-16

Norms:

National sample of 1,000 normally functioning children. Subtest Scaled Scores and Index Scores representing critical domains of learning, attention and memory.

Ordering

Product notice

Effective immediately, your purchase of CMS kits, manuals, forms, and any related physical materials for hand scoring this assessment will now be made available through Multi-Health Systems, Inc. (MHS).

Digital administration and scoring of CMS will remain available on Pearson's Q‑interactive® platform through the end of 2022.

For product information, immediate assistance, or to place an order please visit mhs.com/CMS,or contact MHS Customer service:

Email: customerservice@mhs.com
Phone: 1-800-268-6011
Website: mhs.com

 

 

Product Details

As a screener or diagnostic instrument, CMS measures learning in a variety of memory dimensions:

  • Attention and working memory
  • Verbal and visual memory
  • Short- and long-delay memory
  • Recall and recognition
  • Learning characteristics

Benefits

  • Plays a vital role in assessing learning disabilities and attention deficit disorders
  • Helps to plan remediation and intervention strategies for school and clinical settings
  • Serves as a process skills screening instrument for children with learning disabilities, diagnosed with TBI, ADHD, epilepsy, cancer, brain tumors, or strokes

Features

  • Eight index scores
  • Minimal item bias
  • Extensive clinical validation studies