Advanced Interpretation of the WISC-V Webinar (Recording)

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This one-hour webinar will focus on the interpretation of the WISC-V. The presenter will describe primary, ancillary, and complementary indexes and will use sample data to illustrate the interpretive process. As a result of the session, participants will describe (1) the cognitive processes represented by the WISC-V index scores, (2) the theoretical link between specific cognitive abilities and specific academic skills and (3) how to use performance on the WISC-V to generate hypotheses about processing deficits.

Presenter: Gloria Maccow, PhD

The test structure of the WISC–V was influenced by structural models of intelligence, neurodevelopmental theory and neurocognitive research, and research with clinical populations. The changes in conceptual structure, along with changes to the score differences comparison methodology, and the expansion of process scores enhance the interpretive clarity of the instrument. For example, the availability of separate Visual-Spatial and Fluid Reasoning index scores on the WISC-V allows clinicians to better understand why a child is struggling to perform specific academic skills.

The addition of visual working memory enhances the scale’s clinical utility due to the domain-specific differential sensitivity of auditory and visual working memory tasks to a wide variety of clinical conditions. Complementary subtests provide information on the cognitive processes associated with reading, mathematics, and writing skills.

This one-hour webinar will focus on the interpretation of the WISC-V. The presenter will describe primary, ancillary, and complementary indexes and will use sample data to illustrate the interpretive process. As a result of the session, participants will describe (1) the cognitive processes represented by the WISC-V index scores, (2) the theoretical link between specific cognitive abilities and specific academic skills and (3) how to use performance on the WISC-V to generate hypotheses about processing deficits.